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Congress eyeing skilled workers to boost economy

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The proposed immigration reform is based largely on making the road to citizenship easier for skilled professionals that have advanced education degrees in the fields of math and science. Many members of congress hope that bringing more skilled workers into the country will give the economy a much need boost in the right direction.

In an effort to expand available H-1B visas and related opportunities for skilled workers, the Green Card Lottery could soon be an opportunity of the past. The Green Card Lottery currently awards about 50,000 visas every year to immigrants from countries with low immigration quotas that present large barriers to being able to live and work in the U.S. The program began in the 1990s, but it will soon see its last day if the latest version of the bipartisan immigration reform plan is passed into law.

Now a permanent U.S. resident, one man from Bangladesh won a visa and the opportunity to immigrate to the U.S. through the Green Card Lottery two years ago. He came to the country with little more than ambition saying, “I apply for [and] came [to] America. I want to change my luck. If I can change my luck I can support my family.”

Those opposed to such an action feel that this goes against the American Dream and denies opportunity to those that are disadvantaged and have few rallying for their support. It remains to be seen if this version of the immigration plan is passed.

However, even for employers and skilled workers looking to immigrate in the Washington D.C. area, navigating the employment-based immigration process can be complicated. Many parties will seek the experience of an immigration attorney to more quickly facilitate the process.

Source: Voice of America, "US Green Card Lottery Faces Elimination," Brian Padden, May 16, 2013

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