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Woman set for deportation gets permission to stay longer

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Being involved in any kind of criminal court case can bring one's immigration status front and center. A recent case of a witness who may have seen a fatal incident and the extension of her time in the United States points to how quickly one's deportation status can change. Any Maryland immigrant who may be a witness or involved in a criminal court proceeding may want to follow this particular case.

The 19-year-old woman was arrested for overstaying her visa and had been ordered to leave the country by July 1. However, she is now a potential witness to the shooting of a man by an FBI agent. The man shot was a friend of the accused Boston Marathon bomber and was in the middle of being interviewed about his relationship with the man when he was shot by the FBI.

The details of why he was shot were not being made public. The man's roommate, a Russian woman, who may have witnessed the shooting has now been given a 30 day extension to stay in this country. It is unclear if information she has pertaining to the shooting is why her time in this country has been extended.

When it comes to extensions to avoid deportation, there may be many reasons given. The involvement in a criminal case may mean staying in the United States is more helpful to an investigation or case than if authorities follow through with a previous date for deportation. Any Maryland resident who may be in a similar situation may want to investigate their rights and have a clear understanding of their status in the United States.

Source: The Boston Globe, "Deportation order extended for potential Todashev witness," Nicholas Jacques, July 4, 2013

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