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Counterfeit ring prompts scrutiny of green card process

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Whenever a family is desperate to get into or stay in the United States, it may be tempting to jump at any chance to obtain a green card. There are already tight regulations and processes in place for those seeking a green card; but the discovery of a scam selling counterfeit birth certificates has led to even tighter rules and regulations. Any Maryland immigrants looking to have family receive a green card and join them here in the United States may want to take heed of how this story unfolds.

The ring that was busted was selling fraudulent Cuban birth certificates. Because of the Cuban Adjustment Act of 1966, those who make their way here from Cuba can apply for a green card after just one year and can remain in the country. Having a Cuban birth certificate is very valuable in the quest for a green card.

The man who ran the ring would take illegal immigrants to Florida where they would pretend to have just arrived on shore. They would have the counterfeit document and be coached as to answer immigration questions. The busting of the scam has led immigration officials to more closely scrutinize applications to stay from those with Cuban birth certificates. The man who perpetuated the scheme has received 33 months in jail.

Any Maryland immigrants or families wishing to have loved ones join them may want to be aware of the consequences of being tempted by any kind of quick fix or illegal scam. Knowing the legal process involved and understanding the timeline to get a green card legally is advisable. It is imperative that all immigrants in pursuit of a green card know the laws that pertain to their unique situation.

Source: Fox News Latino, Bogus Cuban Birth Certificate Ring Prompts Closer Scrutiny Of Green Card Applications, No author, Aug. 26, 2013

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