Jump to Navigation

Family deals with deportation of patriarch

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Cases involving deportation and amnesty can be complicated and also take years to be resolved. One man, who came to the United States from Guatemala, had to contend with deportation recently, and his family is left behind to live in this country without him. Anyone in Maryland who has any legal issues pertaining to asylum or deportation may want to follow the results of his case.

The man came to this country in 1993. He claims he was abducted and held captive by rebels in Guatemala for months. He escaped and sought asylum here, but his case was tied up in court for years. Within that time, the man married and had five children. He also worked and bought a house.

His asylum was denied back in 2011, based on a finding that he received military training while in Guatemala. He appealed the case. However, in 1997 he pleaded guilty to a criminal charge related to a bad check. With this criminal charge on his record, he was ordered to be deported back to Guatemala on Dec. 30.

The man left willingly, even paying for his own plane ticket back to his home country. Advocates have pleaded with the authorities, citing the fact that he was a good neighbor and worked hard while in the United States. It remains to be seen if the pleas of family and friends will result an attempt to reunite the man with his family here. Anyone in Maryland who has a lingering case or family member dealing with potential deportation may benefit from understanding how current laws may affect their status and ultimately, their family.

Source: USA Today, Family torn asunder by dad's deportation, Tresa Baldas, Jan. 8, 2014

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
Do You have a case?

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network