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Man pleads not guilty to immigration law violations

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The process of entering the country can be long and complicated. Whether someone is granted asylum or granted a permanent resident card can hinge on their activities in their home country, namely if there are any criminal activities to be concerned with. Recently, a man from Bosnia, who entered the United States in 1998, was alleged to have broken immigration law by not disclosing important information about his past. Maryland readers may be interested in following the story.

The 45-year-old man came to this country as a refugee in 1998 and later was granted the status of permanent resident in 2002. However, it has just come to light that he is wanted in his home country for questioning related to war crimes. It is alleged that, back in 1993 during the Bosnian war, the man was accused of killing a neighbor. He also was arrested back then for threatening the authorities with a hand grenade, and the case was pending when he left for the United States.

The man now owns a business with his wife in the United States. She contends that she didn't know he was wanted in Bosnia. He also has a criminal record in this country for various crimes. He has pleaded not guilty to charges of breaking immigration law by obtaining unlawful documents and concealing his past.

Immigration law in Maryland and elsewhere is very clear about the kinds of criminal convictions that may bar a person from entry to the United States. Any criminal matters while in this country can also affect immigration status and lead to deportation. Professional assistance is available to anyone who may not understand what kind of information from their past may be relevant to their immigration status, particularly if the possibility of remaining in the country appears to be an issue.

Source: ABC News, "Not-Guilty Plea in Immigration Fraud Case", , May 13, 2014

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