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Family immigration laws changing in Maryland and elsewhere

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The law pertaining to immigration status can be complex and evolving. When it entails family immigration and statuses, it can become even more complex, as minor children in Maryland are held in different consideration compared to adults going through the immigration process. One issue that has garnered attention and has made its way all the way to the Supreme Court is the fate of children who age out of the system while waiting for a visa.

A case was put forth by a family who had a 13-year-old son on the waiting list to get a visa. The process took so long that the child aged out of the system and turned 21 without receiving a visa yet. He then needed to essentially go to the back of the line, so to speak. The family fought the case in a court and won the right to allow the man to retain his minor status.

The Supreme Court overturned that ruling. They decided that minor children who age out of the list for a visa need to reapply as adults. The decision could affect countless families, as thousands of minors become adults while waiting for a visa.

Anyone in Maryland who is in the process of receiving or waiting to be approved for a visa may want to explore the meaning of the ruling in-depth. Family immigration matters can change quickly as new rulings and the appeals process lead to a reversal of previous rulings. It is essential to stay up to date on each case that can potentially affect a family’s ability to stay in the country or not.

Source: politico.com, "Supreme Court immigration: Children over 21 go to back of visa line", , June 9, 2014

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