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Guilty plea to crime can trigger deportation

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Anyone who is unsure of their immigration status or who is not a U.S. citizen should be aware of what certain legal proceedings can mean as far as their ability to remain in the country. The immigration process in general can be quite confusing for anyone, and the deportation process can be as well. One deportation situation is making news, as a man may face deportation because of his plea in a court case. Anyone in Maryland who is not a citizen may want to follow this case.

The case involves a 37-year-old man who was arrested a few years ago. After his arrest, he was charged with receiving stolen property. He was allegedly part of a theft ring that was involved in the theft of over $100,000 worth of electronic equipment.

The man pleaded guilty. The plea he accepted led to a sentence of six to 23 months of time in a county prison. The man was told that if he pleaded guilty, there was a chance he could be deported. After deportation proceedings started, the man then filed an appeal, aiming to withdraw the guilty plea he had entered, claiming that he had not been properly informed. That appeal to withdraw the plea has been denied.

Deportation can occur if someone is found guilty of a felony or other crimes. The process can take a great toll on families or those who do not fully understand the laws. Anyone in Maryland who is charged with a crime may want to fully investigate how a guilty plea can impact their immigration status.

Source: pennlive.com, "Man facing deportation can't withdraw guilty plea in Lebanon County theft case, Pa. court says", Matt Miller, July 25, 2014

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