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Deportation becomes complicated as man wants specific route

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Anytime someone enters the country illegally, any kind of legal issue that arises may lead to a deportation hearing. The deportation process in of itself may prove time-consuming and complicated, depending on the particular details of each case. However, when other governments become involved, the case may get even more convoluted. Anyone in Maryland who may find an alleged crime not only leads to deportation from the United States, but also may lead to criminal charges in another country may be interested in the case of a man originally from Lebanon.

The man admits to entering the United States illegally and not telling the truth regarding his documentation. He was recently arrested, and deportation has been ordered. He has worked as an ice cream salesman and has a wife and children here.

The man stands accused of being involved in the deaths of a pair of United Nations peacekeepers. The incident he is alleged to have been involved happened in 1980. The government of Ireland suspects his involvement and wants access to the man. He is requesting that if deported to Lebanon, a route that keeps him out of Europe is sought as he proclaims he is innocent and does not want to risk being entangled in an airport situation that may prevent him from going back to Lebanon. His family also proclaims his innocence despite the Irish government's accusations.

If the man goes through the deportation process, he has already been told he can’t return to the United States for a decade. Any kind of deportation process in Maryland can be further complicated if other governments want the individual for questioning or arrest. It is vital that any immigrant be aware of how other governments may become involved if a deportation proceeding is commenced.

Source: detroitnews.com, "Daughter proclaims father's innocence as Dearborn man faces deportation", , Aug 11, 2014

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