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Judge halts deportation despite government wishes

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The legal process involved in deporting an individual can be complex to understand and can involve conflicting information from different entities. Under certain circumstances, judges in Maryland and across the U.S. may step in and halt a deportation. One man who was deported came back to the United States, and now a judge has stopped another deportation of that individual. 

The case involves a man originally from El Salvador. He was deported and reportedly had a drug conviction. The man then returned to the United States and was living in a suburb of Detroit.

Supporters of the man's quest to stay in this country walked 17 miles to the city to raise awareness of his plight. The man allegedly wants to avoid going back to El Salvador because he fears gangs will target him for attack. While the government still wants to remove him from the country, the federal judge has stopped the deportation, and the judge has set a later day for legal briefs to be filed in the case. The man remains in federal custody while the case unfolds.

Maryland families may be unsure of what rights they have or what steps may be taken to fight or halt a deportation. There are various reason a judge may halt a deportation, including if that individual has a legitimate fear for his or her safety. As far as remaining in custody as a case unfolds, there are also circumstances under which a judge will allow a person to go free until a case is formulated and presented to the court, but that may depend on the details of the case at hand.

Source: washingtontimes.com, "Judge stops man's deportation to El Salvador for now", Aug. 11, 2015

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