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What you should know about the citizenship test

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For many who come to the United States from other countries to live, their greatest desire is to become a U.S. citizen. While there are multiple steps that must be taken to get to that point, perhaps one of the most stressful for applicants is passing the citizenship test that most are required to take. But just what does that test entail?

The test is made up of multiple components. The first is the speaking test which is conducted by a USCIS Officer. As a part of that interview, the ability of the applicant to speak English will be assessed.

In addition, a portion of the civics test will be administered during the interview. While there are a total of 100 questions an applicant must complete, 10 of them will be selected to be asked during the speaking test. Of those 10, six need to be answered correctly.

Also administered during the interview are the writing and reading tests. The ability to write in English is shown by the applicant writing one of three sentences about history or civics, correctly. To demonstrate the ability to read English, an applicant has to read aloud sentences correctly. One out of three must be read correctly to pass.

If an applicant fails any part of this portion of the test, that portion may be retaken between 60 and 90 days following the interview.

Because of how much is on the line for people seeking to become citizens, it is vital that they put in the necessary time to study. Individuals in this situation would likely also benefit from working with an immigration lawyer.

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