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Child immigrants still entering country without documentation

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Readers likely remember well the recent influx of immigrants who were children, and came to the United States, alone. While discussions about that particular incident have since died down, it does not mean that the practice has stopped. In fact, according to information recently provided by the U.S. Border and Customs Protection, in the course of the last two months, more than 10,000 children, who do not have proper documentation, have been caught as they made their way into the nation. 

The number of immigrant children in this situation more than doubled between Oct. 1 and Nov. 30, as compared to the previous year. This is of concern for multiple reasons. The first is the violence in many of these nations tied to drug and gang violence that prompts the young people to look for a better living situation. Next, what happens to the kids once they get here. According to the White House, children in this situation may become victims of sexual abuse or violent crime.

The children who make it to the border, but are then captured, are placed in temporary housing until their deportation proceeding takes place or a relative already in the U.S. takes custody. Among other things, people in this situation nay receive access to healthcare and an education. Last month, an additional 500 beds were added by the Office of Refugee Resettlement to these facilities.

While many of these young people must rely upon pro bono lawyers to build a case to keep them here, if one can afford an immigration lawyer it is a good approach. Among other things they may pursue special juvenile status or special immigrant juvenile status.

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