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USCIS proposes new rules regarding Form I-9

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In previous posts we have written about the difficulties employers may have in securing the immigrant workers they need for their business to succeed. For some employers there are other immigration matters to be concerned with. For example, employers who hire immigrants who are already here must run certain checks. They must confirm eligibility to work in the United States and confirm their identity using the Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification.

Recently, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services proposed changes to the Form I-9. The public will have the opportunity to comment on the proposed changes, that include streamlining the section that concerns the certification of certain foreign nationals, in Section 1 and making it necessary to provide only the other last names a person goes by as opposed to complete names.

The proposed changes would also make it easier to complete the form. For example, one proposed change includes drop-down calendars and lists Instructions on how to complete each field. In addition it is able to check some fields to make sure he information entered in them is done correctly. It also generates a QR code, also known as a quick -response matrix barcode.

Whether these, or the other proposed changes to the form will come to be depends upon the comments received during the comment period. Whatever changes are adopted, it is possible that employers may need guidance in adapting to the changes. When employers have questions regarding immigration matters, a lawyer who practices in this area of law can be of assistance.

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