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Family-based green card can help to bring spouse, child to US

The United States is often viewed as the land of opportunity. However, green card holders or U.S. citizens in Maryland and other states may find that even though they have made it onto U.S. soil, their loved ones are having trouble doing so. An attorney can help to bring a spouse, parent, sibling or child into the U.S. as a legal permanent resident through a family-based green card.

Family immigration can be complex for Maryland families

Family-based green cards are a great way for families to reunite. For family members in Maryland who wish to be reunited with other family members, pursuing options for a green card based on family relationships may be the best option. As with every area of immigration law, there are certain provisions and stipulations that can affect the process and its chances for successfully reuniting family members through the family immigration process.

Time frame for obtaining a family-based green card can vary

U.S. citizens or permanent residents may desperately want to reunite their families by bringing their loved ones to the United States. The time frame for doing so can be complicated depending on the relationship the potential family-based green card holder has to a family member already in Maryland or another state. While family reunification is valued and important to immigration officials, those seeking a reunion should know what to expect.

Timeline can vary for a family-based green card

A family-based green card be a valuable tool to reunite or keep family members together as they build new lives in the United States. Anyone in Maryland who wishes to pursue a green card based on a family relationship may want to be aware of the specifics of the process. It is vital to understand that certain relationships will get preference and the timeline can vary according to the relationship between family members.

Document deadline leads to expired green card and detention

The immigration process entails a great deal of paperwork and deadlines. Any kind of deadline or paperwork mishap can hinder the process and lead to an immigration nightmare. Confusion over a document deadline has led to a green card mishap which might cause a detained mother of five to be deported. Anyone in Maryland who is unclear about deadlines or when to file certain paperwork related to a green card may benefit from understanding the requirements before any adverse effects occur.

Family-based green card option can help Maryland families unite

Family relationships are important across virtually every culture of the world. When family members migrate to the United States, those family members may wish to have other family join them here and go through the immigration process, so as to be reunited in this country. For many Maryland families, a family-based green card may be the best way to reunite and venture toward the pathway to citizenship.

Green card backlog could affect entire family

The immigration process can be one that is stressful and overwhelming to deal with for a family. It can takes years for a family to receive legal status. New immigration laws and executive action will assist in the gaining of green cards for many already here. However, one family recently made news as they noted that the wait for a green card and the backlog that exists could result in losing legal status and the ruining of a family business. Any Maryland business owners concerned about green card status may want to follow the story.

New policy may quicken green card process for Haitians

Immigration issues often entail a great deal of time waiting for approval and then waiting for final paperwork. This is true particularly for obtaining a green card. A new policy hopes to reduce the wait time for Haitians awaiting a green card to live and work here legally. Any Haitian immigrant in Maryland who has family awaiting access to the United States may want to learn more about the program.

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