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Where migrants come from

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According to data from the Homeland Security Department, a growing number of people who attempt to come into the United States were from countries much farther away than expected. Maryland residents may be interested to know the country of origin of many who are coming here illegally.

From October 2015 to August 2016, more than 8,000 people from China, Romania, Nepal, India and Bangladesh were arrested. This figure indicates the growing trend of individuals who are choosing to take a winding route across the seas to travel northward through South America in order to enter the United States through Mexico.

Although Mexico has been the primary subject of the illegal immigration discourse, the number of Mexican nationals who have attempted to enter the United States has actually decreased. Among the top 10 countries of origin of the people who have been caught trying to immigrate illegally are China and India. Overstaying a visa is how many of these individuals have remained in the United States. However, entering in from Mexico is occurring more as obtaining visas has become more difficult.

The fact that an increasing number of migrants come from distant countries is concerning to some and may affect how immigration enforcement, including U.S. border security, is implemented. Currently, immigration agents are tasked with arresting, incarcerating and sending individuals who have entered the United States illegally back to their home country. The deportation process for individuals from far-off continents is lengthy and expensive for the United States. There are also issues with overcrowded detention centers and language barriers.

There are a variety of reasons why people might want to cross the border illegally, including refugees who are seeking asylum. People who are in this position or who have family members who are may want to meet with an attorney to see what options are available.

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