Jump to Navigation

Groups protest to fight deportation as asylum seekers rise

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Immigration has been on the national radar for some time now. As the government takes up the issue and seems to be on the cusps of sweeping immigration legislation, groups have gathered around various parts of the country to protest and fight deportation. Any immigrants in Maryland may want to follow the protests and also see how an increase in asylums seekers is affecting any debate pertaining to immigration.

Groups of younger immigrants are openly staging protests with the argument that deportations under the current administration have been ongoing and have split families up. The protesting groups say they want a pathway to citizenship. Many of them are reportedly young immigrants who came to the United States as children.

Another point of contention spurring protests and making news is the increase in asylum seekers. A recent group of nine from Mexico claimed political asylum to enter the United States. The group is free and awaiting the chance to prove their case in court. However, some see the asylum claim as an easy way in the country considering the number of those seeking asylum has gone from just over 5,000 in 2009 to 23,408 in the last nine months.

The recent protests and highlighting of the use of asylum, any sweeping legislation that is passed may greatly affect the way in which immigrants are able to fight deportation. Fighting deportation can be a very complicated legal process. A thorough knowledge of the current laws and what laws may soon be on the books is paramount for anyone in Maryland who may be facing deportation.

Source: The New York Times, Young Immigrants Protest Deportations, Julia Preston, Aug. 22, 2013

Do You have a case?

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network