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Skier receives stay and won't face deportation just yet

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The immigration process can be difficult under any circumstances. When a couple marries and one person's status is in question, deportation can be an issue if everything isn't aligned correctly. After facing trouble with the legal system, a skier was at risk of being deported but now has a stay, which means she can remain here for another 12 months. Anyone in Maryland who is in the midst of a deportation may be interested in why the woman was given a stay and why deportation was a possibility.

The skier arrived in the United States in 2013 and then stayed here. This was at a time when a person could be in the country for a total of 90 days without having to apply for a visa. Last year, the skier-turned-nurse was arrested and charged with harassment and domestic violence, which started her legal problems.

The charges against the skier were dismissed. When the legal woes appeared, it was noted that she had overstayed her time in the United States by 22 days. The process of completing the application for permanent residency was not finished, even though she had started it at some point. This led to a month of detention. She now has been granted a stay of deportation for 12 months.

Any kind of legal charges can make an immigration issue take front stage. The risk of deportation can be real whether a person is found guilty or innocent of a criminal charge. Anyone in Maryland who fears deportation may benefit from understanding how the visa process works and what conditions may warrant a stay or extension. The incomplete paperwork can make a somewhat simple process all the more difficult to contend with if deportation is pursued also.

Source: koaa.com, "French skier in Colorado gets stay of deportation", March 17, 2015

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