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E-2 visas and Maryland businesses

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The E-2 Treaty Investor visa allows individuals to enter the United States because they have made a large investment in an American business that they own 50 percent or more of. Those who work for such a company may also be allowed to obtain the same visa assuming that they are the same nationality as the owner. British business owners have flocked to places such as Orlando in recent years on such visas.

A company called Thales Group is expected to add 173 jobs in Orlando and another 327 jobs in Melbourne, Florida. The Paris-based company said that it was attracted to Florida because of its pro-business attitude and leadership in the aerospace industry. In addition to creating jobs in Florida, the company is also expected to invest $20 million in the area.

A foreign alien who wishes to live in the United States legally must generally have a visa to do so. Visas may be granted for a variety of reasons including the fact that an individual has made a significant financial investment in the country. It is also possible that a visa will be granted to those who have found work or plan to go to school while in the United States. In some cases, visas are valid for a set period of time.

If an individual is still in the country, it may be necessary to apply for an extension or apply for permanent resident status. Those who wish to become permanent residents may want to work with an attorney who may be able to assist with the process. Individuals who do not speak English may find that working with an attorney makes it easier to communicate with immigration officials or fill out paperwork in a complete and timely manner.

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